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The Student Magazine of Savannah Country Day School

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The Tortured Poet’s Department: Flop or Not?

Taylor Swift: The Tortured Poets Department review – fame, fans and former  flames in the line of fire | Taylor Swift | The Guardian

Last spring, at the kickstart of her highly-anticipated Eras Tour Taylor Swift cut ties with 6 year boyfriend Joe Alwyn. One year later, she has had a two-week link with “The 1975” band lead singer Matty Healy, as well as a so-far, so-good relationship with Kansas City Chief tight end Travis Kelce. Not only has Swift claimed her title for the first to ever score her fourth Album of the Year award at the Grammys, but also on April 19th, she released her long-awaited 11th album, “The Tortured Poet’s Department”, about her messy breakup, internal crises, and everything in between.

 

Ian:

As the die-hard swiftie that I am, I was counting down the hours till this album dropped. From the teasers, I was very aware of the extent Ms. Swift was going to prove herself as a writer and I was so eager to see what she had in store. She’s already proved herself as a poet in past albums such as Folklore or Evermore, but now that she seemed to add “tortured” to the mix I was purely intrigued. Now if I am going to be honest, on first listen I was skeptical, the album felt very one-toned from a first-listen perspective and no song gave the Cruel Summer screaming with the windows down vibe I was looking for. But being a lyrics before sound person, I knew it would grow on me. And that is what it did, with highlights such as “The Smallest Man Who Ever Lived” dishing coveted information on ex Joe Awlyn, and “Guilty As Sin?” explaining her point of view during two two-week fling with Matty Healy, this album soon became all I could listen to. Don’t get me wrong, with her surprise double album I was simply overwhelmed by 31 songs, but as I took them on one-by-one I learned to appreciate most of them. For every skip that this album had there were at least four songs with incredible lyricism that made up for it. And although this album may not be anything breathtaking sonically, I don’t believe that was ever the intent for Taylor. It wasn’t her best, but after she has already reached what we consider the standard for the music industry, how could it be?

 

Feriby: 

I am nowhere near Ian when it comes to Taylor Swift fandom. I have been to two concerts, and am definitely somewhat a fan. With this album in particular, I am torn. I don’t think I have even listened to all of the songs as they make me kind of sad and I found myself hitting skip after the first 25 seconds. The one exception is “I can do it with a Broken Heart”, but I think that credit is given to the sounds on my instagram reels rather than the song itself. What I do respect about the album is that Taylor is very explicit with her messages. No symbolism, just straight up. I respect the blatant bashing of Kim Kardashian and almost all of her exes. A few songs from this album stick out, maybe four out of thirty one, but the others kind of all blend together. I still stand Taylor Swift and respect all she has done with her image and career. This album just didn’t resonate with me like the old ones did. I feel like her lyrics are not as clever in this album. I feel like I could have written most of the songs, which is not saying much. I wanted something that would put a smile on my face when I heard the introductory beat to THAT song, and that is not what I got. The expectation may have been too high for this album, but maybe next time Taylor. 

 

Hi. I’m back a week later to say that the album is growing on me. I suggest you give it a chance and just keep listening. 

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About the Contributor
Ian Rogers
Ian Rogers, Contributor
I have attended Country Day since 2009. I am involved in Karaoke Club, SCD, and Young Dems. Fun Fact: Taylor Swift is my favorite artist!